• Triple digit heat is forecast.
  • Cooling stations are already open in some areas.
  • Heat is the No. 1 weather killer in the U.S.

A state of emergency has been declared in Oregon as another dangerous heat wave moves in to the Pacific Northwest

Residents are being advised to prepare for disruptions to the power grid and transportation, and to take precautions to stay safe.

“Oregon is facing yet another extreme heat wave, and it is critical that every level of government has the resources they need to help keep Oregonians safe and healthy,” Gov. Kate Brown said in a statement. “I encourage Oregonians to take proactive steps to keep themselves and their families safe, including drinking plenty of fluids, taking advantage of cooling centers, and checking in on neighbors, friends and loved ones.”

Excessive heat warnings are in effect now through Saturday along the western and northern parts of Oregon, as well as much of Washington. Parts of Idaho, Nevada and Northern California could also see triple digit temperatures.

“It’s a very, very hot pattern,” weather.com senior meteorologist Chris Dolce said Wednesday. “We’ve got quite a few records in the Northwest being threatened.”

(MORE: Dozens of Records Tied or Broken in June Pacific Northwest Heat Wave)

Cooling centers and hydration stations are already open in many communities.

In Oregon, a statewide help line is providing information on ways to stay cool, bus fare is being waived to cooling centers and air conditioned places like libraries are operating with extended hours.

The city of Portland and Multnomah County also declared heat-related emergencies ahead of the weather.

The precautions come after hundreds of heat-related deaths, including 83 in Oregon, amid record-breaking temperatures across the Northwest earlier this summer.

“There can be no doubt after June that extreme heat can kill and we are treating these events like the health hazard they are,” Multnomah County Chair Deborah Kafoury said in a news release.

Heat kills more people in the U.S. every year than any other weather hazard, including flooding, tornadoes, lightning and hurricanes.

Experts say the danger is increasing due to global warming.

A group of scientists who make up a study group called World Weather Attribution determined the June heat wave would have been “virtually impossible” without human-caused climate change. The latest report from the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, released Monday, highlights the effects of human activities on climate and predicts a future of warmer temperatures and more extreme weather.

And a recent study by a large group of climatologists and epidemiologists concluded that more than a third of all heat-related deaths worldwide are directly connected to human-induced global warming

(More: Things You Can Do To Help Save The Planet)

Here are some tips from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to help stay safe during hot weather:

-Stay in air-conditioned buildings as much as possible.

-Avoid going outside in the heat of the day.

-Don’t rely on a fan as your main cooling source when it’s very hot outside.

-Drink more water than usual and don’t wait until you are thirsty to drink.

-Don’t use the stove or oven to cook – it will make you and your house hotter.

-Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.

-Take cool showers or baths to cool down.

-Don’t engage in very strenuous activities and get plenty of rest.

-Check on a friend, neighbor, or family member – especially the elderly – and ask someone to check on you.

A person uses an umbrella for shade from the sun while walking near Pike Place Market, Tuesday, June 29, 2021, in Seattle. The unprecedented Northwest U.S. heat wave that slammed Seattle and Portland, Oregon, moved inland Tuesday — prompting an electrical utility in Spokane, Washington, to resume rolling blackouts amid heavy power demand. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

A person uses an umbrella for shade from the sun while walking near Pike Place Market, Tuesday, June 29, 2021, in Seattle. The unprecedented Northwest U.S. heat wave that slammed Seattle and Portland, Oregon, moved inland Tuesday — prompting an electrical utility in Spokane, Washington, to resume rolling blackouts amid heavy power demand. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

The Weather Company’s primary journalistic mission is to report on breaking weather news, the environment and the importance of science to our lives. This story does not necessarily represent the position of our parent company, IBM.

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