YOU MAY NOT NEED TO OR EVEN SHOULDN’T. NEWSCENTER5’S RHONDELLA RICHARDSON IS LIVE IN CAMBRIDGE TO BREAK IT DOWN FOR US. >> THIS NEWS FROM THE JOURNAL OF AMERICANS MEDICAL ASSOCIATION WEIGHS A SUPPLEMENTS ABILITY TO PREVENT CANCER, HEART ATTACK, AND STROKE AND FOUND SOME PILLS CAN DO MORE HARM. >> BETA CAROTENE AND VITAMIN E MAY NOT BE RIGHT FOR EVERYONE. >> VITAMIN E. NO BENEFIT AND FOR BETA CAROTENE FOUND INCREASE RISK FOR CANCER ESP LUNG CANCER >> WHAT ABOUT MULITVITAMINS? ONLY YOUR DOCTOR KNOWS WHAT YOU NEED. >> I TAKE MAGNESIUM IT HELPS ME SLEEP BETTER BASED ON MY OWN OBSERVATIONS. >> SHOPPERS! GUESSING CAN BE DANGEROUS >> IF THEY ARE WATER BASED AND WE HAVE TOO MUCH WE PEE IT OUT AT HIGH DOSES VITAMIN A. IT CAN WEAKEN BONES AT VERY HIGH DOSES IT CAN DAMAGE LIVER. >> WILL THAT CHANGE YOUR SHOPPING HABITS PROBABLY NOT. >> WOULD YOU CONSIDER A BLOOD TEST BEFORE PICKING A SUPPLEMENT, I WOULD, GOOD QUESTION BUT I’M GOING TO GET THIS FIRST. >> WE RECOMMEND A REDUCED THE NUMBER TO TAKE THE RIGHT SUPPLEMENTS. >> THE TASKFORCE ALSO FOUND MODERATE DOSES OF VITAMIN A SUPPLEMENTS MAY REDUCE BONE MINERAL DENSITY, VITAMIN D HAS POTENTIAL HARMS, SUCH AS A RISK OF KIDNEY STONE. >> THE U.S. PREVENTIVE SERVICES TASK FORCE SAYS THE EVIDENCE IS INSUFFICIENT TO DETERMINE THE BALANCE OF SUPPLEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTATION. WE ARE TALKING ABOUT MULTIVITAMINS. THE FOLKS IN THE STORE A VERY EDUCATED AND THEY ALSO SAY TO CHECK WITH YOUR DOCTOR FIRST.

New study shows no known health benefits from supplements: Boston doctor weighs in

A new study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association shows that taking daily vitamins and supplements may not be worthwhile.The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force is sounding the alarm about beta carotine and vitamin E, in particular, and wants further study on multivitamins and other supplements to determine if they benefit people’s health.The study focused on cardiovascular health and the risk of heart attack, cancer and stroke in healthy adults, and found that beta carotene — which the human body converts into vitamin A — can increase the risk of cancer, especially when combined with vitamin E.”There was one study that did it, used beta carotene in combination with vitamin E, and it increased the risk of lung cancer even more than just beta carotene alone,” said Dr. John Wang, interim chief scientific officer at Tufts Medical Center. “Especially for those who have an increased risk factor lung cancer, such as smoking or occupational exposure to asbestos.”The task force also found that moderate doses of vitamin A supplements may reduce bone mineral density and that vitamin D also has potential harms, such as risk of kidney stones.Wong, who is part of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, said people who are on prescribed medications must check with their doctor before taking daily vitamins or supplements because they could negatively impact their health. For instance, supplements can interfere with the absorption of other medications.

A new study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association shows that taking daily vitamins and supplements may not be worthwhile.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force is sounding the alarm about beta carotine and vitamin E, in particular, and wants further study on multivitamins and other supplements to determine if they benefit people’s health.

The study focused on cardiovascular health and the risk of heart attack, cancer and stroke in healthy adults, and found that beta carotene — which the human body converts into vitamin A — can increase the risk of cancer, especially when combined with vitamin E.

“There was one study that did it, used beta carotene in combination with vitamin E, and it increased the risk of lung cancer even more than just beta carotene alone,” said Dr. John Wang, interim chief scientific officer at Tufts Medical Center. “Especially for those who have an increased risk factor lung cancer, such as smoking or occupational exposure to asbestos.”

The task force also found that moderate doses of vitamin A supplements may reduce bone mineral density and that vitamin D also has potential harms, such as risk of kidney stones.

Wong, who is part of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, said people who are on prescribed medications must check with their doctor before taking daily vitamins or supplements because they could negatively impact their health. For instance, supplements can interfere with the absorption of other medications.

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