Rain clouds gathered at the Mumbai skyline.

(Sanjay Hadkar/TOI, BCCL, Mumbai)

Saturday, November 10: Having endured dry weather since the monsoon bid adieu in mid-October, Mumbai and other parts of Maharashtra may now be in for some unseasonal rainfall activity thanks to Cyclone Mandous’ remnant.

After making landfall near north Tamil Nadu during the early hours of Saturday, Cyclone Mandous continued its west-southwestwards while gradually de-intensifying into a depression by Saturday evening.

The Bay of Bengal system’s westward movement inland will continue until it re-emerges into the Arabian Sea in two days, reports TOI. And while it will no longer generate strong winds, its influence will ensure wet weather persists over the country’s southern half — including the state of Maharashtra.

The system is expected to flip into the Arabian Sea off the Karnataka coast as an upper air circulation. It may then trigger moisture incursion from the southeast towards Maharashtra, effectively paving the way for some rainfall activity, reports TOI.

In line with this indication, the IMD’s regional met centre in Mumbai has predicted thunderstorms and lightning over Coastal Maharashtra, Madhya Maharashtra and Vidarbha from Sunday to Tuesday (December 11-13) and Marathwada on Sunday and Monday (December 11-12).

Accordingly, these subdivisions have been placed on a yellow watch during this three-day forecast period, with the advisory urging the residents to ‘be aware’ of the thunderstorm activity.

Mumbai, the state capital, may experience light drizzles and thundershowers at the start of next week. However, the IMD officials have clarified that this forecast may change depending on how the Cyclone Mandous’ remnant evolves and moves.

3-day rain forecast from Friday to Monday mornings.

(TWC Met Team)

Remnant’s impact to improve Mumbai’s air quality?

If it does rain in Mumbai, the wet and windy weather will have a ventilating effect on the metropolis, whose air quality has stayed at unhealthy levels of late. In the past two weeks, the Maharashtrian capital has consistently recorded AQIs in the range of ‘poor’ to ‘very poor’ categories.

Even on Saturday afternoon, Mumbai’s overall AQI remains at a ‘poor’ 211. For context, an AQI between 0 and 50 is considered “good”; 51 to 100 is “satisfactory”, 101 to 200 is “moderate”, 201 to 300 “poor”, 301 to 400 “very poor”, and 401 to 500 “severe”.

Experts hold the rapid construction, adverse weather conditions and increasing pollution from vehicle emissions responsible for the falling air quality in the city.

Amid such high pollution levels, local hospitals in Mumbai have reported an increase in the number of people coming in with breathing difficulties and other ailments related to the poor air quality, the BBC reported. Doctors have advised people to wear masks and avoid going out when unnecessary, even as Mumbai’s civic officials take urgent steps to improve the air quality.

(With inputs from IANS and TOI)

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