The Orionid Meteor Shower is expected to peak overnight tonight (Oct. 21) and into the early pre-dawn hours of Saturday (Oct. 22), and with mostly clear skies expected across greater Cincinnati, this makes it a great time to get outside and watch some fireballs streak across our sky! What makes this year’s viewing conditions even better is that our moon phase is currently waning, or shrinking, with about 14% illumination tonight, making for darker skies. If you are within a metro area, city lights could add enough light pollution to wash out some of the show, but more rural areas away from lights will have the best viewing.The Orionids get their name due to the fact that the meteors appear to originate around the Orion constellation. Around greater Cincinnati, Orion can be found around the southwestern sky and about 20 degrees above the horizon. This meteor shower typically comes around each year near the end of October because the Earth is passing through a swarm of meteoroids left behind by Halley’s Comet. As these bits of dust and small pieces encounter our atmosphere, they encounter friction and burn up overhead. While you will be able to see some meteors streak across the sky tonight, the best viewing will be during the pre-dawn hours of Saturday (Oct. 22). This is because Earth at that time will be moving towards the direction the meteors originate, making them faster and brighter across the night sky.

The Orionid Meteor Shower is expected to peak overnight tonight (Oct. 21) and into the early pre-dawn hours of Saturday (Oct. 22), and with mostly clear skies expected across greater Cincinnati, this makes it a great time to get outside and watch some fireballs streak across our sky!

What makes this year’s viewing conditions even better is that our moon phase is currently waning, or shrinking, with about 14% illumination tonight, making for darker skies. If you are within a metro area, city lights could add enough light pollution to wash out some of the show, but more rural areas away from lights will have the best viewing.

The Orionids get their name due to the fact that the meteors appear to originate around the Orion constellation. Around greater Cincinnati, Orion can be found around the southwestern sky and about 20 degrees above the horizon.

This meteor shower typically comes around each year near the end of October because the Earth is passing through a swarm of meteoroids left behind by Halley’s Comet. As these bits of dust and small pieces encounter our atmosphere, they encounter friction and burn up overhead.

While you will be able to see some meteors streak across the sky tonight, the best viewing will be during the pre-dawn hours of Saturday (Oct. 22). This is because Earth at that time will be moving towards the direction the meteors originate, making them faster and brighter across the night sky.

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